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on capital, most regrettable. in a fiscal cliff free fall, tax rates on capital gains could rise to 24%. those dividends could increase to a whopping 44%. here now is former reagan economic adviser art laugher. how can you have capitalism without capital and why is there a war on capital, that includes cap gains, that includes dividends which will triple. it also includes the estate tax. why is there a war on capital? >> i have no idea, larry. i think it's just pure politics. but it's sort of lovely the words and looking them up. i understand that the french don't have a word for entrepreneur or laissez faire. [ laughter ] >> because they never use it. >> they never use it. economics is all about incentives. if you tax people who work, you pay people who don't work, don't be surprised if you find a lot of people not working. it's the rich issue here, which is just fascinating to me. if you tax rich people and give the money to poor people, you're going to get lots and lots of poor people and very few rich people. just look at what happened in britain two years ago when gordon brown rai
on the wealthy. you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> it republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a the a time when the american economy was doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> while geithner was drawing a line in the sand, house speaker john boehner was busy trying to lift his jaw off the flar after geithner presented the president's debt reduction plans to him last week. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i have just never seen anything like it. >> yes, indeed, it seems that republicans are not quite sure what to make of the president taking a harder line across the bargaining table. >> you know, the president's idea of a negotiation is roll over and do what i ask. >> i think we're going over the cliff. it's pretty clear to me they made a political calculation. the president's plan is just, quite frankly, a joke. >> i'm not sure about that, senator graham, but there will be plenty of time for jokes later this evening with every member of cong
people who call me, they're more worried about the fiscal cliff than about rates going up a couple of points. thomas rooney in your party, if there is truly entitlement reforms that's going to preserve social security and medicare for generations to come, it's going to be very difficult for me to oppose higher rates for the rich. what about that? >> and to mr. rooney's point, if in fact there were fundamental, significant reform of medicare, medicaid and social security so that we in fact save and strengthen and secure those programs, just like we did in our budget,those were included in the president's proposal, then that's something that we would talk about and very seriously consider because there's where we got to get. we got to get real solutions. the problem with the president's proposal is it's not a real solution, it's all politics. >> congressman tom price, thank you for coming on the program. >> we've been talking about the president's advantage right now. so, karl rove was not about to sit on the sidelines. his crossroads gps is running a spot today criticizing the presi
we could do is go over the fiscal cliff. we have the same tax rates that we have when bill clinton was president. significant cuts in defense and also significant human services can you tell us. >> katie, let me ask you, before you respond to what governor dean is saying. there is logic to what howard dean is saying. i don't happen to agree with it. but i know where he's coming from. katie, let me ask you this -- katie can't hear me. we'll wait for her to get back hooked in. howard, what about the notion that i'm posing tonight -- i've said this a few times -- republicans better be careful. they're not going down your road and the democrats aren't going down your road. you have middle class tax cuts for the democrats and it sometimes sounds to me as an old reagan conservative that the republicans better watch themselves because sometimes it sounds like they are kind of defending rich people. that's their whole mantra, just defending rich people. and i think that's not where they should be. >> i would agree. if i were politically advising the republicans, which i'm certainly not, i
are talking about the patch about the 2012 taxable year, and unlike the fiscal cliff that affects tax rates that apply next year, the patch applies to the return that we will all have to file early next year. if there is not congressional action here, there is the abrupt increase in tax on the 2012 taxable year under -- in 2011, approximately 4 million people paid the amt. if there's not a patch, 30 # million people will be required to pay in 2012, and for the current taxable year, and they will pay app additional $90 billion in tax. none of them -- few of them have any idea that this is on the table. >> host: is the isr prepared? >> guest: the irs took a fairly unusual, but i think correct position, taking the position that congress will do the responsible thing so they did their tax programming for next year for the 2012 return, assuming congress would enact the patch before the end of the year. if -- i think that was the reasonable thing to do because almost -- even i believe they will do that -- however, it does mean if there's not a patch, the tax return filing season next year will be
tax rates on the rich to avo avoid the fiscal cliff. erin burnett's been looking into that. she's going in depth on that tonight. what have you found out? >> it seems more and more likely that we're going to end up in a situation where we get a pretty awful deal if we get a deal. there's not going to be a grand bargain, which is a big failure, but are there going to be republicans who are willing to make serious corp. mizs. tom mcclint ok's going to be our guest. we're going put the hard questions to him tonight, plus, wolf, you remember amy copeland, the young woman who went on the bungee jump and got the stitches and had to go back because of the flesh eating bacteria? >> what happened? >> well, she survived and she is our special guest tonight. she was honored with a woman of the year award and her story is pretty incredible. she talks about what she still struggles to do, whether there are still moments in the middle of the night where she feels life isn't fair. >> i'll look forward to that, to the whole show at the top of the hour. thanks very much. >> still ahead, robbing
want with the president and house republicans at an impasse over how to avoid the fiscal cliff, a bipartisan group of governors arrives in washington for a meeting. >> our focus today was not to endorse a specific plan nor to dismiss a specific plan, but rather to point out, as gary mentioned, as governors, we think it's important that we have a seat at the table. >> flash point serious, secretary clinton in brussels where nato leaders are sending patriot anti-defense missiles to turkey and warning syria of any thought of using chemical weapons. prince william leaves the hospital after visiting kate. she remains hospitalized for severe morning sickness. good day. i'm amount li-- andrea mitchell live in washington. the senate has managed to vote on something, rejected a u.n. treaty to extend rights to the blind and disabled, rights that have been the law of the land here in the united states since 1990. despite an emotional appearance from bob dole just out of walter reed, 89 years old, a passionate advocate for equal rights for the disabled since his first speech on the senate
prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest americans -- remember, it's only 2%. the size of the problem in some sense is so large, it can't be solved without rates going up as part of that. again, i think there's broad recognition of that reality now. >> one fallback option republicans are reportedly considering is to accept tax cuts for the middle class, allow rates to go up for the wealthiest, and then start the fight over again during debt limit talks early next year. yesterday at a business roundtable of ceos, president obama took a hard line, warning his opponents not to consider this strategy. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to dell creting votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> well, i wonder, the president's saying, steve, that, you know what, we can
actually maybe wants to go over the fiscal cliff if the republicans do not agree to raising income tax rates even though yesterday they agreed to these deductions and loopholes and getting rid of them, which essentially many people argue, would do somewhat of the same thing. your thoughts? >> right. so there are going to be consequences for syria if they use chemical weapons and the president thinks there is going to be severe consequences for the republicans if, in fact, we go over this precipice and raise your hand if you're tired of this cliche about the fiscal cliff. he thinks look, the republicans will suffer terribly, the country will be thrown into some turmoil, he thinks and he thinks he's the winner either way. it's easy for the president and his team to go out there and posture on this. but both sides are playing this game a little bit. the republicans are doing the same thing. they're play to go their base. they want to make sure that regardless of what ends up happening at the end, if a deal is struck, that they at least have the appearance of sticking to their principles.
. >> reporter: on his first view sbr interview on the fiscal cliff, he rejected john boehner's proposal. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal is out of balance. >> reporter: raising taxes on households earning more than $250,000. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: republicans want smaller tax increases overall and no movement on higher income tax rates. they want to cut unnamed tax bre breaks and deductions, which they say will do more to boost economic growth. the white house considers the proposal and economic rationale behind it laughable. >> we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> reporter: republicans answered back ba-humbug. >> this is absolutely not serious and the administration knows it. >> reporter: six governors, three from each party, met the president and said acid they believe business leaders in their states won't invest and hire until a deal gets done. >> until this gets resolved in a way that's not
, if congress does nothing, doctors will be reimbursed 27% less than they are at current rates, starting in january. that could spur thousands of doctors to stop seeing medicare patients. speaking of the fiscal cliff, there has been all this focus on one dangerous man who stands in the way of a deal that could avert it. grover norquist is neither elected nor has he ever run for office, so why is washington so scared of him? >> taxes went up, spending didn't go down. >> he's been called a kingmaker, a patriot, and the ideological godfather of the tea party. since the mid'80s, grover norquist, the founder of americans for tax reform, has been the driving force behind the anti-tax movement. his goal, to take big government and in his words, drown it in the bathtub. norquist's weapon is the taxpayer protection pledge, which was at one point signed by 95% of gop members of congress. >> you raise your hand if you feel so strongly about not raising taxes. >> reporter: on the campaign trail this year, only one republican presidential candidate, jon huntsman, dared to cross him. norquist has clou
released his counterproposal on the fiscal cliff that grover norquist is still very much in charge of the republican party. republicans said once again that they were absolutely unwilling to raise tax rates on the wealthiest of americans. even though they were adopted in 2001 as a temporary measure only because we had a surplus. they were temporary because ten years later, we might have a surplus. we might need the money. that's exactly the situation is today. but sadly, it is not grover norquist or mitt romney or mitch mcconnell that's running the republican party. it is still a big lobbyist by the name of grover norquist. have a good one folks!
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)